Bon Vivant introduces versatile cocktail ingredient

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A tonic syrup that allows bartenders to experiment with the fundamental flavor profile of tonic water has been created by Giuseppe Gallo.

Bon Vivant Tonic Syrup has been in development for almost two years and is inspired by the original formula of the Dutch West India Company. The syrup can be used as a base for homemade tonic waters or added to cocktails to create an elegant bitterness.

Capitalising on the worldwide trend for the Gin & Tonic, Bon Vivant Tonic Syrup has been developed in response to demand from bartenders for a cocktail ingredient that allows them to consistently make their own tonic water.

After researching original tonic recipes dating back to the 1600s, Bon Vivant is made using natural quinine from cinchona bark sourced from the Congo and lemons from California and Argentina.

The citrus oils provide a refreshing, crisp flavour, whilst the quinine rounds off the syrup with a bitter finish at the end. Transparent in colour with a light golden hue, it is less sweet than pre-made tonic waters, and the natural flavourings allow the flavour profile of the gin or spirit it is paired with to shine through.

Giuseppe Gallo said: “Customers’ palates are becoming more sophisticated with a return to classic cocktails such as the negroni and bitter aperitivo style drinks, and the gin boom doesn’t show any signs of slowing.

“We have designed Bon Vivant Tonic Syrup in the hope that bartenders will be able to offer a more unique, authentic tonic water option, as well as opening up new flavour profile opportunities in mixed drinks.”

In a Gin & Tonic, Bon Vivant Tonic Syrup works well with London Dry gins that have a strong juniper note, however the amount can be adjusted to accommodate different botanical profiles across the gin category. It also works with different spirits and liqueurs, with recommended serves including Amaro & Tonic, Vermouth & Tonic and Italicus & Tonic. As a cocktail ingredient it can be used in sour classics such as an Aviation or White Lady instead of sugar.

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